Catching The Next Wave

April 8, 2008

Note: The Pages o’ Peat have moved to http://peat.org/ — please update your bookmarks and references accordingly. Thank you!

Every now and then a set of technologies gets twisted together by a small group of dedicated people, and a new industry is born — a watershed event that demonstrates a new way of thinking about things, and throws out a lot of old rules.

There are a three that are coming together to trigger another watershed.

The first is open, popular, mobile Internet devices.  Think Blackberry, iPhone, or the slew of new MIDs that Intel showed off a few days ago in Shanghai.   These are built around the assumption of ubiquitous access to the Internet, high resolution displays, multimedia capabilities, and a bit of horsepower under the hood.  Any college student can get their hands on the Android or iPhone or Windows Mobile SDKs and build a hot little application in their spare time.

The second is web services.  It doesn’t matter if it’s WS* or REST or XML or JSON — the point is being able to query and manipulate data at a distance, with open protocols across public and private networks.  Pick your web framework of choice … building a web service is almost a drag and drop process today.

The third and final piece is cheap and scalable cloud computing.  The physical infrastructure capable of serving billions of transactions is available to anyone with a credit card and a little spare time on the weekend.  Amazon’s Web Services, Google’s App Engine, and a slew of smaller providers sell scalable computing and bandwidth by the hour and gigabyte.

These three fit together to form a fundamentally different picture of mobile computing:  light weight applications that fit in your pocket that take advantage of the local hardware, but seamlessly tap into “Internet scale” computing power and storage.

I’ve talked with a dozen entrepreneurs in as many months who are exploring these waters.  Streaming media (push and pull), information discovery and analysis, mobile social interactions, and location aware applications all depend on this trinity of capabilities.  I’m just one guy in a groundswell of people who are looking at the landscape and thinking “hot damn!”

What makes this so exciting is how easy it is to do today.  You don’t need a dozen engineers and a multi-million dollar budget.  You don’t need to negotiate with a corporate gatekeeper.  You don’t need to pitch to VCs.  You don’t need to wait.

2009 is going to bring a wave of media rich, location aware, always connected mobile applications to hundreds of millions of people.  I’m confident we’ll see a real forehead slapper by the end of 2008 — a tool or service that is painfully obvious, but fundamentally changes how we think about a day to day task.  It’ll make a millionaire or two, at the very least.

This will be fun.  :)

Note: The Pages o’ Peat have moved to http://peat.org/ — please update your bookmarks and references accordingly. Thank you!

Note: This is a little out of date, since the Beta 3 build automatically generates an empty XIB and the code for including it in new projects. If you’re looking for Apple’s introductory tutorial on how to build applications with Interface Builder, click here.

So, the trick to using Interface Builder is figuring out where to put the files, and plugging the XIB interface into the app.

The file question is easily answered:  File > Write Class Files to the directory in your project where the rest of your classes live.  For really simple apps with a single view, select your existing AppDelegate class and IB will merge the changes for you. You’ll also see a new .xib file in your classes directory, containing your interface.

Connecting the XIB interface is also relatively straight forward.  In your AppDelegate file, change what self.contentView points at:

self.contentView = [[[NSBundle mainBundle] loadNibNamed:@"XIBFileName" owner:self options:nil] objectAtIndex:0];

Where XIBFileName is the name of the generated XIB file without the .xib extension.

Anyhow. I’m still learning, and this is with a beta release of the iPhone SDK, so you’re welcome to leave comments if you have better ideas or tips on working with IB for the iPhone. Thanks!
 

 

This Feels Mighty Good

April 3, 2008

Note: The Pages o’ Peat have moved to http://peat.org/ — please update your bookmarks and references accordingly. Thank you!

iphone-sdk

… we will have much fun together. 

In February I’ll officially run out of reasons to not buy an iPhone. Direct from the horses mouth:

Let me just say it: We want native third party applications on the iPhone, and we plan to have an SDK in developers’ hands in February. We are excited about creating a vibrant third party developer community around the iPhone and enabling hundreds of new applications for our users. With our revolutionary multi-touch interface, powerful hardware and advanced software architecture, we believe we have created the best mobile platform ever for developers.

[...]

P.S.: The SDK will also allow developers to create applications for iPod touch.

Thanks, Apple.

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